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Jessica Sanchez’s “Tonight” and ‘Pinoy Pride’ Braindeadness

March 23, 2013

A YouTube video featuring former American idol sensation and finalist Jessica Sanchez performing her new song “Tonight” with Ne-Yo has immediately garnered hundreds of thousands of views and suddenly made her fans in the Philippines “proud pinoys or Filipinos”.

Isn’t funny how a single video– or person– could make thousands of music lovers in these parts realize or feel they’re suddenly proud of their country? 

The problem is, Ms Sanchez is technically not a Filipino. She’s an American by nationality and choice. Are these pinoys proud because Sanchez is a talented singer, or because her mom happened to be a former Filipina? I said “former Filipina”, because the international singer’s mom decided to live, work, have family,  and perhaps die in America. She’s probably a proud American. Let me inform my reader that there’s a big difference between nationality and ethnicity. Unlike ethnicity, which has something to do with your skin color, accent or native culture, nationality is a choice.

But what is there to be proud of when Ms. Sanchez achieved her dream as an ‘individual’ and chose to remain an American? What is the meaning or concept of “pride” in the first place?

The dictionary definition of “proud” is as follows: “Feeling or showing pride: as having or displaying excessive self-esteem, much pleased, or having proper self-respect.”

On the other hand, the standard definition of “pride” is the following: “a feeling or deep pleasure or satisfaction derived from one’s own achievements, the achievements of those with whom one is closely associated.”

Thus, you can only be proud of your own personal achievement and those of others (parents, parents, siblings, close relatives) closely related to you. However, you cannot be proud of someone– a complete stranger– who does not even know you or is not closely related to or associated with you. Pride is earned.

Pride and admiration are not synonymous. For instance, I admire a lot of foreign artists because of their talent, not because of their nationality.

When Jessica’s new song was posted on YouTube, it was immediately spammed and infested with “Pinoy Pride” comments.

The comment section was littered with pathetic comments like “go pinoy!”, “Filipino pride”, etc. Some of the early comments I saw were as follows:

  • “Here’s another Philippine pride. The good thing is, even she’s a Runner Up, she’s more famous than the Grand Winner.”
  • “Be the best pilipina.”
  • “PHILIPPINES >3”
  •  “so so much excellent song..WOW. i am proud to be FILIPINO and she’s got moves a lot and she’s different than before wow…..”

Sige, shabu pa! LOL!

Instead of enjoying the music video, I felt ashamed. So, I thought I had to post something. I decided to post the following comment, which immediately turned the comment section into a virtual battlefield between the anti-flips (users who agreed with me) vs. the pinoy pride flips.

comment

The after effect was simply epic! I learned that one can change people’s behavior or perception by telling or showing them the harsh, bitter truth or reality. One can change a stupid, evil culture by exposing what’s wrong with it. Perhaps this is how headhunting culture or the tradition of offering human sacrifices ended in the past.

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4 Comments leave one →
  1. Donne Peda permalink
    March 24, 2013 3:38

    Incomplete definition of the word PROUD. Other meaning of proud — adj.
    1. pleased or satisfied, as with oneself, one’s possessions, achievements, etc, or with another person, his or her achievements, qualities, etc (http://dictionary.reference.com/browse/proud?s=t)

    • March 24, 2013 3:38

      Do you understand what this phrase means: “with another person, his or her achievements, qualities…”?

    • carlos argarin permalink
      March 24, 2013 3:38

      I think Donne has a point.

      • March 24, 2013 3:38

        Unless you wanna take that definition OUT OF CONTEXT. A definition should be within its own context.

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